Archives for Inky Cloak

Answering the call of the dancefloor

He was playing Donna Summer records at his sister’s house parties when he was still at primary school, won a DJ contest when he was still a teenager in Italy, and has been spinning at Horse Meat Disco for more than a decade. Who better to DJ our preview party than Severino Panzetta? From the moment we started organising the preview night for We Raise Our Hands In The Sanctuary at The Albany this summer, our first choice to DJ the after-party was Severino Panzetta, the languidly approachable resident at Horse Meat Disco, the south London gay night that no less an authority than legendary

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Dancing to a different beat in Deptford: from Outdance to We Raise Our Hands

  Back in the late 1980s, the Albany used to host a weekly LGBT club night that attracted hundreds of revellers from the local community and beyond every Saturday. Former promoter Brendan Nash explains how it all came about. The Albany in Deptford has a fantastic tradition of developing LGBTQ work like our new show We Raise Our Hands In The Sanctuary, which tells a gay friendship story set in the 1980s London underground gay club scene. Around the same time they scheduled a week of research and development for this show as part of their Hatched new writing programme,

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We are all dancers

Choreographer Mina Aidoo talks to Inky Cloak about her approach to choreographing the trailer for our new show. What drew you to the project to choreograph the trailer for We Raise Our Hands In The Sanctuary? Disco! That was it. I really love disco music. I already knew Earth Wind & Fire and all the classic American acts, so it was fascinating to explore some different aspects of the genre through the references you gave me, such as early ’80s boogie (So You Wanna Be A Star by Mtume) and Italo disco (Spacer Woman by Charlie). It helped situate me in

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“I’m not a drag queen, but I have done an awful lot of drag”

Carl Mullaney, who plays Brandi in We Raise Our Hands In The Sanctuary, has been performing in drag since he left drama school – in Chicago, Saucy Jack and the Space Vixens and even The Bill. Interviewed during the second week of performances, he reflects on the challenges of bringing Brandi to the stage.   In what ways do you feel like you identify with your character? I can identify with the character of Brandi because she is a (for want of a better phrase) a nightclub entertainer and I have an element of that in my life. When you

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It’s all about valuing the drive to be who you want to be

Oseloka Obi, who plays ambitious stage electrics student Joseph in We Raise Our Hands In The Sanctuary, reveals how he connects to what, for him, is the biggest theme of the play – becoming the person you yourself want to be. What is your relationship to the themes of the play? The theme that most resonates between me and the play, is that fundamentally, it’s about being who you want to be and I think that’s something that I’ve always valued and been aware of so the idea of these characters, these people in this world doing what they want to do

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Playing a character who is not the average black man seen on stage

Jahvel Hall, who plays up-and-coming 1980s DJ Michael in We Raise Our Hands In The Sanctuary, explains how he researched a complex character who faces down the homophobia, racism and HIV/AIDS prejudice of the 1980s. How has the rehearsal process been for you, how does it compare to other productions you have done? Having three weeks instead of four or more was a bit intense, we sort of hit the ground running which was good. I think the main thing about the rehearsal process for me – aside from getting lines, getting the dialogue out and practising it with the other actors on stage –

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Chanelling a sense of a character’s potent sexuality

Dean Graham, who plays club promoter Paul in We Raise Our Hands In The Sanctuary, talks about how his performance has evolved in the rehearsal room and on the stage. How did you prepare for the role of Paul? Well obviously, I did a lot of research that [writers and directors] Daniel and Martin passed over to me and I followed that. I was also really interested in notions of masculinity. I think that there’s a lot that you can take from your own life as a man and your relationship to your own father. I think it’s one of

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Armoured by the fierceness of character

When your only experience of drag is a little light cross-dressing on holiday as a kid, how do you prepare for the role of a fierce drag queen? It’s all about channelling fearless icons, says Emile Clarke, who played Lady Brandi in our work-in-progress preview this summer. When you started developing the character of Lady Brandi, the down-at-heel New York drag queen in our show, where did you look for inspiration? Grace Jones definitely. She was someone I brought along to the show-and-tell you guys organised on day one of rehearsals at The Albany (image below). I love Grace Jones’s fearlessness. In

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“I am Duchess Of Malfi still”: how to create a 1950s upper-class alter-ego

It’s a year to the day since Lauren John Joseph auditioned for Cover Her Face, back when it was not much more than a good idea with a bad working title. As they were in Berlin at the time, we did it over Skype, but even the inevitable picture breakup and dropped connections couldn’t conceal how the part should be theirs. Since finishing Cover Her Face earlier this year, Lauren John Joseph has been developing a tantalising new show at Battersea Arts Centre (The Last Night in the Life of Alexander Geist, which should hit the stage next year); jetting back

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A saucy and ambitious devil is dancing in this circle: the fascination of Antonio

Tom Campion talks to Daniel Fulvio about the challenges of playing Antonio in Inky Cloak’s queer adaptation of The Duchess Of Malfi. DF: How did you prepare for the role of Antonio? TC: This was a bit of a difficult one: when you prepare for a role, everything comes from the script. And although this adaptation was out there and bold, not a lot of the text was changed. That said, for Antonio, everything in his world was changed. And more so than any other character – apart from, perhaps, The Duchess. In Webster’s original, Antonio is in this world for the

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